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Suspending sediment in a fluid

June 24, 2009

Blogging will be even lighter than usual for the next two weeks … I am doing some traveling and going to see some rocks I’ve been wanting to visit for several years. More on that when I return.

Before I leave, I’ll leave you with this image of a recent sand storm in Saudi Arabia … which reminded me of something.

Sand storm in Riyad, Saudi Arabia, June 2009 (credit: International News Bureau; http://www.intnewsbureau.com/riyad-sand-storm-massive-sandstorm-hits-saudi-arabia/)

Sand storm in Riyad, Saudi Arabia, June 2009 (credit: International News Bureau; http://www.intnewsbureau.com/riyad-sand-storm-massive-sandstorm-hits-saudi-arabia/)

Experimental turbidity current (click on image to go to Flickr set; see this site for associated research - www.physics.utoronto.ca/nonlinear/turbidity/turbidity.html )

Experimental turbidity current (click on image to go to Flickr set; see this site for associated research - http://www.physics.utoronto.ca/nonlinear/turbidity/turbidity.html )

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One Comment leave one →
  1. June 28, 2009 3:52 am

    It’s not just a visual thing- At least in the dust storms that I’ve been in here in Oz, the dust is blown in by the cold front, so it is in a discrete denser layer of fluid. Usually in my case, the pictures aren’t as good because the cold front triggers T-storms, but I’ll see if I can find anything decent.

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