Skip to content

Friday Field Foto #72: Meandering river in Patagonia

November 21, 2008

Real quick Friday Field Foto today … busy, busy.

This is one of my favorite photos in my collection. I like the way the light is reflecting off the river.

Rio de las Chinas, Ultima Esperanza, southern Chile (© 2008 clasticdetritus.com)

Rio de las Chinas, Ultima Esperanza, southern Chile (© 2008 clasticdetritus.com)

We climbed up this ridge (note people on right side of photo) to get a look at the siltstone and shale exposed in the gulley, which is mostly out of view. I think we spent more time enjoying the view of this beautiful meandering river down in the valley instead of looking at the rocks.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Advertisements
6 Comments leave one →
  1. Jeremy permalink
    November 21, 2008 11:32 am

    Nice oxbow lakes in the picture as well to the upper left of the people, or are those just relic sand bar bodies? Does the river drain the lake in the far background of the picture?

  2. November 21, 2008 4:14 pm

    Stunning river photo, thanks. Usually these “tortuous” meanders are seen when rivers are near their base level, i.e. controlled by a downstream river confluence or lake/ocean. Even though they’re struggling to move water and sediment downstream and near-zero valley slope, parts of the meanders flow up-valley. Go figure that one out.

  3. November 22, 2008 9:12 am

    Jeremy … the river is flowing from right to left in this photo, eventually drains into a big lake to the left of and out of this photo.

  4. November 22, 2008 9:04 pm

    Great photo. Very neat river meanders.

  5. Karen permalink
    November 22, 2008 9:37 pm

    Very cool photo. It’d make a great illustration in an introductory geology text — much better than the cartoons often dredged up to display this sort of thing.

Trackbacks

  1. Aerial Photograph of River Transition | Today In Geology

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s