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Grain Settling Equations and Plots With R

August 18, 2013

Zoltan Sylvester wrote a nice post a couple weeks ago exploring grain settling equations. He plotted up these equations using some Python code. Here, I simply reproduce what Zoltan did but with R code. So, go read Zoltan’s post first. This was more of an exercise in continuing to learn R rather than an exploration of grain settling physics. And, in this case, doing the ‘translation’ is a nice introduction to how Python works.

My R code works (yay), but seems bulky and cumbersome (boo). I’m sure there are ways to streamline it, feel free to comment with suggestions.

This first box of code defines constants, the three equations to be plotted, and then applies those equations to a range of particle sizes (diameters from 0 to 0.5 mm).

# Some constants for the equations
rop = 2650.0 # density of particle in kg/m^3
rof = 1000.0 # density of water in kg/m^3
visc = 1.002*1E-3 # dynamic viscosity in Pa*s at 20C
C1 = 18 # constant in Ferguson-Church equation
C2 = 1 # constant in Ferguson-Church equation

# Stokes
v_stokes = function(d){
  R = (rop-rof)/rof # submerged specific gravity
  w = R*9.81*(d^2)/(C1*(visc/rof))
  return(w)
}
# Turbulent
v_turb = function(d){
  R = (rop-rof)/rof 
  w = ((4*R*9.81*d)/(3*C2))^0.5
  return(w)
}
# Ferguson-Church equation
v_ferg = function(d){
  R = (rop-rof)/rof 
  w = ((R*9.81*(d^2))/(C1*(visc/rof)+
      (0.75*C2*R*9.81*(d^3))^0.5))
  return(w)
}

# Define a range (sequence) of particle diameters
d = seq(0,0.0005,0.000001)

# Invoke the function for that range of particle diameters
ws = v_stokes(d)
wt = v_turb(d)
wf = v_ferg(d)

This next box then creates the plot shown below the code.

# Plot diameter (in mm) vs. settling velocity for diameters 0-0.5 mm
plot(d*1000, ws, ylim=c(0,0.15), type="l", lwd=3, col="blue", 
     xlab="Particle Diameter (mm)", 
     ylab="Settling Velocity (m/s)", yaxt="n")
lines(d*1000, wt, col="darkgreen", lwd=3)
lines(d*1000, wf, col="red", lwd=3)
# Axes labels, ticks, annotation, legend
axis(2, at=seq(0,0.14,0.02), cex.axis=0.85, las=1)
abline(v=c(0.063,0.125,0.250), col="gray40", lwd=0.9, lty=5)
text(0.022,0.105, "clay & silt", cex=0.75)
text(0.094,0.105, "vf sand", cex=0.75)
text(0.190,0.105, "fine sand", cex=0.75)
text(0.410,0.105, "medium sand", cex=0.75)
legend(0,0.15,legend=c("Stokes","Turbulent","Ferguson & Church"),
       cex=0.7, lty=c(1,1,1), lwd=c(3,3,3), col=c("blue","darkgreen","red"))
# Plot points from Table 2 of Ferguson & Church
D = c(0.068,0.081,0.096,0.115,0.136,0.273,0.386,0.550,0.770,1.090,2.180,4.360)
W = c(0.00425,0.0060,0.0075,0.0110,0.0139,0.0388,
     0.0551,0.0729,0.0930,0.141,0.209,0.307)
points(D,W, pch=20)

plot1

The next part is the same equations but for an expanded range of particle diameters (up to pebbles) and plotted in log-log space.

# Define a range (sequence) of particle diameters
d = seq(0,0.01,0.00001)

# Invoke the function for that range of particle diameters
ws = v_stokes(d)
wt = v_turb(d)
wf = v_ferg(d)

# Plot in log-log space
plot(d*1000, ws, ylim=c(0.00001,10), xlim=c(0.01,10), type="l", log="xy", 
     lwd=3, col="blue", xlab="Particle Diameter (mm)", 
     ylab="Settling Velocity (m/s)", xaxt="n", yaxt="n")
lines(d*1000, wt, col="darkgreen", lwd=3)
lines(d*1000, wf, col="red", lwd=3)
# Axes labels, ticks, annotation, legend
axis(2, at=c(0.00001,0.0001,0.001,0.01,0.1,1,10), cex.axis=0.85, las=1)
axis(1, at=c(0.01,0.02,0.05,0.1,0.2,0.5,1,2,5,10), cex.axis=0.85, las=1)
abline(v=c(0.0156,0.031,0.063,0.125,0.250,0.5,1,2,4), col="gray40", lwd=0.9, lty=5)
text(0.011,0.0008, "fine silt", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(0.022,0.0021, "medium silt", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(0.043,0.0004, "coarse silt", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(0.09,0.0004, "very fine sand", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(0.17,0.0004, "fine sand", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(0.33,0.0004, "medium sand", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(0.7,0.0004, "coarse sand", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(1.4,0.0004, "very coarse sand", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(2.7,0.0004, "granules", cex=0.75, srt=90)
text(7,0.0004, "pebbles", cex=0.75, srt=90)
legend(0.01,6,legend=c("Stokes","Turbulent","Ferguson & Church"),
       cex=0.7, lty=c(1,1,1), lwd=c(3,3,3), col=c("blue","darkgreen","red"))
# Plot points from Table 2 of Ferguson & Church
D = c(0.068,0.081,0.096,0.115,0.136,0.273,0.386,0.550,0.770,1.090,2.180,4.360)
W = c(0.00425,0.0060,0.0075,0.0110,0.0139,0.0388,
      0.0551,0.0729,0.0930,0.141,0.209,0.307)
points(D,W, pch=20)

plot2

Comparing Zoltan’s Python code to my R code is a great way to see how each language works.

I’ve been working with and thinking a lot about the silt range of grain sizes lately … look for a post in the future focused on that.

See all my posts about R here.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. August 18, 2013 7:35 am

    Thank you, i learn a lot!!

  2. August 18, 2013 12:38 pm

    You and Zoltan should get out more…;-)

  3. Christie permalink
    August 19, 2013 4:25 am

    Hey Brian thanks for this post. What about clay flocs? Can you use the same equations, with appropriate size and density? Or must the surface roughness/particle friction be accounted for differently? Thanks

  4. August 19, 2013 4:54 am

    Christie … actually, zooming in on the fine end of these relationships was something I was going to tackle next. And when I say ‘next’ I mean hopefully soon. The effective density of similar-sized flocs is, I imagine, highly variable.

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